Home Blog Page 2

Educational Goals

World Top 20 Project’s Education Rankings: Breaks Down 2020

 

In a year where the world changed, a new country climbed atop the education landscape. While in the classroom, where the action counts. Getting students into them was the biggest challenge in 2020.

Countries that lack the 21st century technology infrastructure were doomed at the start. In continents like Africa, where 80 percent of the children had no access to the Internet, to 69% in Asia, face the cold reality they are second-class citizens.

The World Top 20 Project lives in reality and accepts one-fifth of children have no access to schools. Not happy about the situation, the project knows four is larger than one. So, finding a solution to improve the quality of the lives of all children that do have, has brought new concerns.

As usual, the World Top 20 Projects annual Education Rankings list over 200 nations’ strengths and weaknesses, and shows how it affects the economic and social conditions of countries.

What makes the Education Rankings unique is the goal. That goal has brought a challenge to every nation to achieve five educational goals by 2030.

From Early childhood enrollment rates for 3 to 5-year-old. To oversee children 6 to 11 complete Primary education. To achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 4 missions for 12 to 14-year-old children to attend and complete lower secondary education levels.

The Project rankings also focus on fifteen to eighteen-year girls and boys completing twelve years of schooling to help to prepare them for early adulthood. With the advanced, level of higher education in achieving a College Graduation degree at the top level of education.

Our mission is to bring order and support to every child, no manner where they live.

Below you will find more information about the World Top 20 Project 2020 Education Rankings.

https://academicminute.org/paraphrasing/ba-creative-writing-philippines/3/ essay on the war against terrorism chief seattle address essay click here go to site dangerous take viagra young what is parenthesis essays on kohlbergs theory of moral development enter legitimate essay writing service apa essay example 2010 is viagra safe for 16 year olds go here click sample essays on short stories how to become a freelance writer source link enter free plagiarism essay checker levitra price philippines https://sugarpinedrivein.com/treatment/manfaat-obat-apo-clopidogrel-75mg/10/ https://tetratherapeutics.com/treatmentrx/cialis-over-counter-walmart/34/ writing functions expectations of viagra click https://academicminute.org/paraphrasing/thesis-statement-beginning-words/3/ cag essay competition 2012 case study essay conclusion book review index follow brand viagra 50 mg for sale critical english essay literature old Database Tiers Process

Tiers breaks down the countries in the World Top 20 Project educational database rankings. The rankings are used to support the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030 Initiative.

The focus is to help nations achieve the SDG 4 education mission – to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.

SDG 4 has ten target areas and 11 indicators to measure its success. To help keep this simple, the World Top 20 Project sets five educational goals for each nation to reach by 2030, which will help them capture all ten targets and match all 11 indicators.

Tier 1: Focus on the top 20 nation’s progress and digression in improving education in their country. It also looks at how this is affecting their economic growth and impacts their social conditions.

The Top 20 Countries Ranked in 2020 are:

1. Denmark– Last Year Rank: 3 – Becomes the second country ranked number one in the World Top 20 Project international database. Denmark captures this year’s spot by being one of the most progressive countries attacking the COVID 19 pandemic. While other countries panicked, Denmark leaders decided to take a more measured approach to protect their school staff and provide education services to their students.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Access to the Internet

2. Netherlands-Last Year Rank: 28 – This was a shocker, the Netherlands rose 26 spots to become number two. Similar to Denmark, the Netherlands school leadership made it possible for students to attend school with little disruption.
Progress: School Safe Levels; Digress: NI,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

3. Germany– Last Year Rank: 23 – Germany ranks number three. Not to say their education system is lacking, but to rise 20 spots from last year is eye-opening. As the two countries rated above them, their governments were aggressive in addressing the pandemic. Making sure their country suffers as little as possible in the world crisis.
Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Secondary School Completion Rate, Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

4. Ireland– Last Year Rank: 20 – Moves into the top 10 education ranking. Ireland is a country that is, overshadow by the rest of the world, yet in education, they remain one of the best.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, Strengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: Poverty Level

5. Sweden– Last Year Rank: 7 – Sweden remains in the top 10 and moves into the top five. Every year Sweden proves to have one of the world’s best education systems.
Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: High School Graduation Rate,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

6. Finland– Last Year Rank: 1 – Finland falls to number six. After being ranked the best for the first two years of the World Top 20 Project education rankings. Always classified as the perfect model in education, they may need a reboot in 2021.
Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate;
Strengths: Poverty Level, Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate

7. South Korea– Last Year Rank: 2 – In a year went anything could go wrong, South Korea education system ranking dropped five spots. This may be a small setback for a big comeback.
Progress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Free Schools,
Strengths: Crime Rate, Weaknesses: Poverty Levels

8. Slovenia– Last Year Rank: 10 – Remains a top 10 nation in education, according to the World Top 20 Project rankings. Slovenia is one of those sleeper countries that appears out of nowhere, but if you check the data, they belong.
Progress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Out of School Children,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: National Debt

9. France– Last Year Rank: 24 – France is another surprise member of the World Top 20 Project education rankings. France has a very high-level of immigrants to educate. So no one expects them to rank as one of the best countries in educating their population. They have found a way to get the job done. Well done.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: National Debt

10. Belgium– Last Year Rank: 21 – Belgium is another country that handled the COVID 19 crisis with strong government leadership. Moving up 11 places to make the top 10.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: National Debt

11. Australia– Last Year Rank: 27 – Australia climbs into the World Top 20 Project rankings to number 11. Australia is a progressive country, always looking for ways to improve its status in the world. It seems they have a plan, and it is working – Improve education in their country. SDG 4 approved.
Progress: Academic Levels – Test Scores; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

12. Iceland– Last Year Rank: 30 – Iceland moved from number 30 to number 12 in this year’s education rankings. Like their Scandinavian brothers, they were able to provide education services to their students. As many countries struggled to do in 2020.
Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI,
Strengths: Poverty Levels, Weaknesses: National Debt

13. Japan– Last Year Rank: 13 – Japan one of Asia’s most powerful countries remains as number 13 in the World Top 20 Project education rankings. Japan is viewed as one of the world’s powerhouse in the World Top 20 Project. To achieve all its targeted five-education goals for 2030.
Progress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio,
Strengths: Crime Rate, Weaknesses: National Debt

14. United Kingdom– Last Year Rank 5 – The UK fell nine places in this year’s ranking. While in other international education ranking polls, they are picked number one. Ridiculous!
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

15. Norway– Last Year Rank: 9 – Norway falls out of the top 10 this year. A little surprising, since they do well in all areas of education. This was a strange year, and this ranking is too.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: NI,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: NI

16. Canada– Last Year Rank: 32 – Canada is another country that withstood COVID 19 and delivered services to its students. The only drawback to the Canadian education system is missing international data to accurately establish their status as one of the best.
Progress: Academic Levels – Test Scores; Digress: NI,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: National Debit

17. Spain– Last Year Rank: 18 – Spain falls one spot from last year’s rankings. With all the divide in the country between Spain and Catalonia, they remain together in improving education and are jointly committed to achieving the UN’s SDG 4 objectives.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: National Debt

18. Israel– Last Year Rank: 6 – Israel fell out of the top 10 for the first time this year. COVID 19 affected them as it did to so many other countries. Israel will try to bounce back in 2021 and return to the top half of the World’s Top 20 rankings.
Progress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, Strengths: NI, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

19. Russia– Last Year Rank: 12– Just like everyone else, Russia took a hit from COVID 19. As it disrupted economics and caused mass confusion, countries were put to the test. Russia has always landed on its feet and remained as one of the world’s best-educated countries in 2020.
Progress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio,
Strengths: National Debt, Weaknesses: Crime Rate

20. Poland– Last Year Rank: 14 – Poland continues to shine in quest of achieving SDG 4 educational standards. Finishing a little lower than last year, Poland remains a strong and focused country in the new 21st – century knowledge-based marketplace.
Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores,
Strengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels, Weaknesses: Poverty Level

*NI= No Information

Areas of Strengths and Weaknesses in Education

Tier 2: Ranks countries 21 through 40, whose progress is tracked from last year. The key areas of interest were, their strengthen indicators, and where they need to improve education standards.

Most countries strength where their students to teacher ratio. The area most struggled with was early childhood education. Showing more government spending on education was used to improve technology in schools.

21. Hong KongProgress: College Graduation Rate; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 22. SingaporeProgress: Academic Levels -Test Scores; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 23. PortugalProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 24. LithuaniaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 25. EstoniaProgress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Academic Levels -Test Scores, 26. New ZealandProgress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: NI, 27. SwitzerlandProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 28. HungaryProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: College Graduation Rate, 29. United StatesProgress: Free Schools; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 30.TaiwanProgress: Academic Levels – Test Scores; Digress: NI, 31. LatviaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 32. GreeceProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 33. Czech RepublicProgress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 34. AustriaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 35. ItalyProgress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 36. ChinaProgress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 37. TurkeyProgress: NI; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 38. ArgentinaProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 39. MexicoProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 40. ChileProgress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores

Tier 3: Focuses on countries ranked 41 to 60. A lack of education data was available from most of these countries. Which shows a poor communication structure of governments to their local levels. From the countries, we were able to find data. A majority of them have developed a good student to teacher ratio. Indicating a desire to improve education for their country and students, but a large disconnect from school leadership for creating a self-sufficient education system.

41. SlovakiaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 42. LuxembourgProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 43. KazakhstanProgress: High School Graduation Rate; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 44. Costa Rica-Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 44. Saudi ArabiaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 46. GrenadaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 47. BruneiProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 48. San MarinoProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 49. FijiProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 50. SamoaProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 51. SeychellesProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 52. MongoliaProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 53. VietnamProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 54. EcuadorProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 55. MaltaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 56. NepalProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 57. BelarusProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 58. OmanProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 59. Saint Kitts and NevisProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 60. MaldivesProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI

Tier 4: Shows the results from countries ranked 61 to 80. Here a lack of education data available means the government again is failing their students. Without, data, much-needed data, to plan growth or investment, these countries’ economic and social development is doomed to fail. The poor relationship between these government leaders in education is the main reason for their problems.

61. Sri LankaProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 62. Macau (PRC)Progress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Academic Levels – Test Scores, 63. UzbekistanProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 64. KyrgyzstanProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate, 65. Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 66. AlbaniaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 67. IndonesiaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 68. SerbiaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 69. Timor-LesteProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 70. GeorgiaProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 71. PhilippinesProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 72. KiribatiProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 73. AlgeriaProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 74. ColombiaProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 75. Antigua and BarbudaProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 76. CroatiaProgress: Early Childhood Enrollment Rate; Digress: NI, 77. PeruProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 78. MauritiusProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 79. GibraltarProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 80. MontenegroProgress: NI; Digress: NI

Tier 5: Represent countries ranked 81 through 100. Points to countries where investment in education sets to limit the growth potential of its people. More teachers are needed; more schools need to be modernized. Life has to be put back into communities and villages. This is where the United Nations SDG 4 mission will be tested the most.

81. IranProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 82. BahrainProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: Secondary School Completion Rate, 83. LiechtensteinProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 84. EgyptProgress: NI; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 85. BelizeProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 86. AzerbaijanProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 87. TajikistanProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 88. BhutanProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 89. Malaysia– Progress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 90. KenyaProgress: Primary School Completion Rate; Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 91. QatarProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 92. NauruProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate: Digress: Students to Teacher Ratio, 93. KuwaitProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 94. DominicaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 95. BoliviaProgress: Secondary School Completion Rate; Digress: NI, 96. Dominican RepublicProgress: NI; Digress: High School Graduation Rate, 97. Saint LuciaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 98. ArmeniaProgress: NI; Digress: NI, 99. RomaniaProgress: Students to Teacher Ratio; Digress: NI, 100. British Virgin Islands (UK)Progress: NI; Digress: NI

Economic and Social Impact of Education

 

Tier 6 through Tier 10 will explore the strengths and weaknesses of countries ranked below 100. Countries ranked 101 to 120 results are below.

Tier 6: You can see most of these countries’ weaknesses stems from the social condition of adult illiteracy. The strengths are generated from a low–wage labor force. That demonstrates the lack of education is affecting both the economic and social growth of the population.

101. IndiaStrengths: Unemployment Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 102. LaosStrengths: Unemployment Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 103. UruguayStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Access to Internet, 104. TunisiaStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 105. EswatiniStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 106. GhanaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 107. ThailandStrengths: Unemployment Rate; Weaknesses: Access to Internet, 108. MoldovaStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 109. Burma (Myanmar)Strengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels,110. North KoreaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 111. VenezuelaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Crime Rate, 112. El SalvadorStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Crime Rate, 113. MoroccoStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 114. South AfricaStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Crime Rate, 115. Jamaica– Strengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: National Debt, 116. PanamaStrengths: Unemployment Rate; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 117. Solomon IslandsStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 118. Cape VerdeStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: National Debt, 119. Sao Tome and PrincipeStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 120. CambodiaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels

Tier 7: Ranks countries 121 to 140, shows the strengths of these countries are in workforce development, but, again offering low wage-paying jobs. The next strengths indicator is a low National Debt, which signifies these nations have poor trade agreements.

It may be because most of these countries’ weaknesses are in adult literacy, which points to lower-skilled jobs and early entry into the workforce. Again demonstrating the lack of a high quality education system drags down a society.

121. TogoStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 122. BangladeshStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 123. Papua New GuineaStrengths: Unemployment Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 124. TuvaluStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 125. Sierra LeoneStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 126. GuatemalaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 127. JordanStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: National Debt, 128. SurinameStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 129. LesothoStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 130.BeninStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 131. YemenStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 132. HondurasStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Crime Rate, 133. RwandaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 134. BulgariaStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 135. Cote d’IvoireStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 136. PakistanStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 137. DjiboutiStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 138. SudanStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 139, MauritaniaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 140. BarbadosStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Poverty Level

Tier 8: Ranks countries 141 to 160, the curse of illiteracy shows up again; where most of these countries have a high rate of adults that have a hard time reading, writing, or counting.

Without those life-skills, it is impossible to sustain a healthier way to live or grow a family. Nevertheless, if a heart beats people will try to survive so they go to work. They live day, by day, which insuring these countries will have a vibrant and ready-to- go workforce as their strengths.

141. CameroonStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Child Mortality Rate, 142. EritreaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 143. Burkina FasoStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 144. CubaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: NI, 145. BrazilStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: National Debt, 146. AfghanistanStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 147. NigerStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 148. MadagascarStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Access to Electricity, 149. Tanzania– Strengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 150. LiberiaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 151. BurundiStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level,152. ComorosStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 153. Marshall IslandsStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 154. SenegalStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 155. MaliStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 156. UgandaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 157. BahamasStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: National Debt, 158. GambiaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 159. MozambiqueStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: National Debt, 160. ChadStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels

Tier 9: Ranks countries 161 to 180, is a group of nations that shows an imbalance of government leadership.

Most of these countries’ strengths are their natural wealth. Their weaknesses are their abilities to reach their whole country. Maybe, it’s greed that separates them from trusting one another or poor communication skills due to a lack of educational development.

161. Central African RepublicStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 162. Guinea,- Strengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 163. CyprusStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: National Debt, 164. United Arab EmiratesStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 165. Aruba (Neth.)Strengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 166. UkraineStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Nation Debt, 167. Republic of MacedoniaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 168. Niue (NZ)Strengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 169. TurkmenistanStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Child Mortality Rate, 170. Trinidad and TobagoStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Crime Rate, 171. GuyanaStrengths: Access to Clean Water; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate,172. Puerto Rico (US)Strengths: Nation Average Age 40; Weaknesses: Work Force Participation, 173. PalauStrengths: Access to Clean Water; Weaknesses: Child Mortality Rate, 174. LebanonStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: National Debt, 175. Bosnia and HerzegovinaStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate,176. MalawiStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 177. NamibiaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Unemployment Rate, 178. VanuatuStrengths: Crime Rate; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 179. EthiopiaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 180. ParaguayStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level

Tier 10: Ranks countries 181 to 203 unlike the countries in tier 9, half of these countries children grow up in war-torn nations. An explosion is a culture; going to school is a James Bond movie. So why send my child to school?

Poverty levels, high child mortality rates, and unclean living conditions separate these countries from the rest of the world. Went will the rest of the world care?

181. PalestineStrengths: Adult Illiteracy Levels; Weaknesses: Nation Average Age 20, 182. TongaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, 183. Bermuda (UK)Strengths: Child Mortality Rate; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 184. Republic of the CongoStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 185. BotswanaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 186. Equatorial GuineaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Child Mortality Rate, LibyaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 188. IraqStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 189. NicaraguaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level,190. Federated States of MicronesiaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, NigeriaStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Level, ZimbabweStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Access to Electricity,193. HaitiStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 194. GabonStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 195. Guinea-BissauStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 196. AngolaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Nation Average Age 16, 197. SyriaStrengths: Access to Electricity; Weaknesses: Poverty Level, 198. ZambiaStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 199. KosovoStrengths: National Debt; Weaknesses: Work Force Participation, 200. Democratic Republic of the CongoStrengths: Work Force Participation; Weaknesses: National Debt, 201. AndorraStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: NI, South SudanStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Adult Illiteracy Levels, 203. SomaliaStrengths: NI; Weaknesses: Child Mortality Rate

2020 is gone. It left a mark on history. Where do we go from here? What countries will survive and thrive? The right answer is those who can educate their next generation and those who cannot.

Help us Change the World. A Smarter World…A Greater World: the World Top 20 Project

Learn How Here

The 2020 YEAR IN REVIEW: The New World Order

The Rich got richer, the poor got poorer.

The year 2020 could not have been written any better by a great science fiction Arthur of horror. The mass terror, the moment went it could all end. The clock is ticking, your air supply is fading, and your life light is going to end, it’s getting darker, and darker. This is it. Your life lights go out in 2020!

What happen? Why is this happening to me? Will life ever be the same? Has the freedom of choice been taken away from me? If so, who has done this?

What is going to happen to my children?

How can anyone make sense of this all? This is crazy.

A plague, I say, a man made pandemic that will whip us all out, O my goodness.

The Time to ponder

How this happens, and why this happen? What will the future hold? What will we do and what will 2021 look like and beyond is yet to be determined. 2020 was a year like no other. Starting with

January

On January 21, the US announced its first case of the coronavirus that has swept China. So far, China has reported more than 300 cases and 9 deaths. The US citizen recently traveled from China, and has been treated at a hospital in Seattle. On January 24, a second case was confirmed in the US. The woman was traveling back to Chicago from China. The US is considering evacuating other citizens in Wuhan.

February

On February 5, President Trump was acquitted on both articles of impeachment. One article was abuse of power and the other was obstruction of Congress. President Trump is still considered impeached by the House, but acquitted by the Senate. On February 8, President Trump fired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who testified against him at the trial, for “insubordination.”

March

On March 4, Japan announced it will quarantine visitors from China and South Korea due to the Coronavirus. The visit of China’s president has also been delayed, but Japan says the Olympics are still on track. That same day, Australia banned visitors from South Korea in an attempt to curb Coronavirus. On March 5, Italy announced it will shut down all schools for a few weeks to try and contain the Coronavirus. All professional sporting events will have no fans in the stadium for the next month. So far, 107 people have died from the Coronavirus in Italy. Later, Iran announced it will temporarily free 54,000 prisoners in an attempt to curb the issue. As of March 6, the total number of Coronavirus cases worldwide topped 100,000

Is this all a Conspiracy caused by the US Democratic party and world leaders to remove President Donald Trump and his new way of leadership led by the Russian? Is this all a master plan to use the seasonal death that annually kills 100,000 Americans – mostly older adults by the flu, an opportunity, to regain control?

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that the 2019-2020 season involved two waves of activity and moderate severity with an estimated 38 million people falling ill, 18 million visiting a health care provider, 400,000 patients hospitalized and 22,000 lives lost. That being said, case counts do tend to run higher due to the fact that not everybody gets diagnosed for flu and cases/deaths are invariably missing from official totals.”

Could this all be – “Up to 650 000 people die of respiratory diseases linked to seasonal flu each year.

Have we entered into the twilight zone?

What goes up must come down

The health care industry is overwhelmed with more patients in the history of mankind. Madness has hit the streets, stay inside, no one is safe.

It’s time to revaluate.

April

April 30, Eurozone economy shrinks at -3.8% between Jan and Mar 2020, the fastest rate on record with Euro Bank President Christine Lagarde warning the 2nd quarter will be even worse

May

On May 26, hundreds of people in Minneapolis gathered at the intersection where George Floyd died. Floyd was being arrested after police were called for a potential forgery in progress. During the arrest, an officer placed his knee on Floyd’s neck, not moving it after Floyd said he couldn’t breathe. Floyd died later at the hospital. Four officers have been fired due to the incident. Protesters have gathered around Minneapolis, highlighting the #blacklivesmatter movement. By May 31, protests erupted in cities all around America. Curfews have been placed in cities and the National Guard has been deployed, but protests have continued. Various peaceful protests have led to clashes with the police, resulting in riots and looting. Various buildings have been caught on fire, as well. On May 30, in Detroit’s protest, an unknown suspect shot at the crowd, killing a 21-year-old male protester.

June

June 29, New Security Law Gives China Sweeping Powers Over Hong Kong. The law, approved in Beijing with speed and secrecy and signed off by Xi Jinping, will tighten the Communist Party’s grip on Hong Kong after last year’s protests.

Can You See A Pattern?

The COVID 19 pandemic started the new year in China, now six months in China is moving into Hong Kong to end democracy. Is China the new leader? Has the Russian strong arm been replaced? Stay tune there is more to come.

July

The US economy posts the largest quarterly fall on record with GDP down 9.5% for the 3 months to June 30. Follow the money trail. The last time this happen was in 1958, amid a depression that coincided with a devastating pandemic known as the “Asian flu.”

August

U.S. stocks hit record high, ending shortest bear market in history. Defying the coronavirus pandemic’s Savvy investors have been showered with profits, while millions of people without money to invest or even pay rent in the months ahead have been left out. Only about half of Americans own stocks, mainly through retirement accounts, according to the Federal Reserve.

September

Schools reopen around the World Despite Coronavirus Spread. But, teachers are refusing to go.

“I cannot risk bringing the virus home to my own family, and I would not be able to live with myself if I unknowingly passed the virus on to you or your families.

October

Talk about how the rich got richer. Billionaires’ wealth rises to $10.2 trillion amid COVID crisis. Billionaire wealth equates to a fortune almost impossible to spend over multiple lifetimes of absolute luxury. At the same time, more than 40 million Americans filed for unemployment. With tens of millions of Americans out of a paycheck and the stock market plummeting by 37% in March, how is it that the rich have continued getting richer?

Wealth concentration now is as high as in 1905, this is something billionaires are concerned about. The problem is the power of interest on interest – that makes big money bigger and, the question is to what extent is that sustainable and at what point will society intervene and strike back?”

The fact that billionaire wealth had increased so much at a time when hundreds of millions of people around the world are struggling could lead to public and political anger. “Is there a risk they may be singled out by society? Yes,” he said. “Are they aware of it? Yes.”

The super-rich were able to benefit from the crisis because they had “the stomach” to buy more company shares when equity markets around the world were crashing. Global stock markets have since rebounded making up much of the losses. The shares in some technology companies – which are often owned by billionaires – have risen very sharply.

November

Saw the end of the Donald Trump empire fall. President Trump was unseated by long-time wannabe king of the castle, Joe Biden. However, never giving in to the truth, Mr. Trump refused to go. Say it ain’t so Joe.

Biden won the highest voter turnout in modern history. And that is saying something, in a pandemic. Where we go from here is less Russia and more China.

December

COVID claim over 1.8 million lives in 2020. What a year. The only saving Grace is, if you are reading this post, YOU SURVIVED 2020

So to the rich, to China, and to whomever it concerns, in regard to writing this horror story. We the people will never die. Because, we believe in a dream and a dream can never die.

The Incredible South Korean Education System

South Korea’s commitment to invest in education pays off

South Korea performance in education in the last four years has been masterful in execution. Their results in standardized testing and their student’s ability to advance towards college graduation is the model over 200 nations, are chasing to be the best in education.

In NJ MED’s 2017, World Top 20 Education Poll that ranks the world’s best education systems, South Korea’s captured, the number one spot for the fourth consecutive year. Even, with Japan closing the gap by seven points, it looks like South Korea will still be number one in 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022.

{ South Korea Current Education System }

The only hope other nations can catch-up or even keep up, is by improving their early childhood education system. With enrollments, teaching quality, and parent involvement. With that, said, what if South Korea, also improves their early-childhood education system?

South Korea May Be the Best, But

Heavy is the crown who wears it.

With all the success South Korean students have achieved, some of the country’s children suffer from high rates of depression and mental fatigue. That lead to emotional breakdowns that lead to irrational thoughts that leads to suicide.

Most of the critics of the South Korean teaching method and objectives say they are pushing children and their parents too hard to passing standardized test, rather than teaching students to develop normally as adolescents.

This is something the South Korean government must take very seriously. However, they feel a discipline focus is part of their cultural pride, and something that has strengthened the nation, not weakened it.

We hope, they can come to a common ground to help to ensure every child develops in a healthy, safe, and nurturing environment.

2017 World Top 20 Education Poll Final Rankings

In 2017, four new countries joined the World Top 20 Education Final Rankings – Estonia, New Zealand, Taiwan, and Italy. Replacing 2016 ranked countries – Germany, Sweden, France, and Hungary.

Hong Kong and Israel moved into the Top 10, and China went from ninth in 2016 to fifth in 2017. The United States fell from number seven in 2016 to sixteen, with Russia remaining as the only non-Asian country in the Top 5.

Here is the breakdown of the 2017 Top 20 World Ranked Education Systems:

Number 20: Italy makes their first Top 20 finish in the World Top 20 rankings. This year Italy’s education system ranked top 10 at two academic levels – Early Childhood Enrollment and High School graduation rates. Italy also ranked number 19th in the third quarter poll.

Number 19: Taiwan also makes their first appearance in the World Top 20 Education Poll final rankings. Taiwan ranked top 20 in three educational levels – Secondary, High School and College. They ranked as high as number thirteen in the third quarter poll.

Number 18: New Zealand makes their third top 20 finish in the World Top 20 Poll. New Zealand’s education system ranked top 15 at two academic levels – Early Childhood Enrollment and High School graduation rates. They ranked has high as number 8 in the third quarter poll.

Number 17: Estonia’s education system makes their first top 20 finish in the World Top 20 Education Poll, since 2013. In 2017, Estonia finished top 15 in two education levels – Early Childhood Enrollment and High School graduation rates. Estonia ranked in all fourth quarters of this year’s rankings and finished at their projected position from 2017, first quarter poll.

Number 16: United States education system fell nine positions from last year’s top 10 finish. The US ranked top 15 in three education levels – Primary, Secondary, and College. After, finishing number one in the second quarter rankings in 2017, the US dropped out of the top 20 rankings in the third quarter and returned to finish four positions higher than their first quarter projected ranking.

Number 15: Norway ranked top 20 in three educational levels – Early Childhood Enrollments, Primary, and College Graduation Rates – in 2017. In the first quarter poll rankings, Norway projected to finish number 6 at the end of the year. Nevertheless, Norway’s education system makes their fourth appearances as one of the world’s 20 best-educated countries.

Number 14: Ireland education system finishes as one of the best in NJ MED’s World Top 20 Education Poll for the fifth time. Ireland rated in 3 top 20 education levels – Primary, Secondary and College Graduation Rates. Ireland making the 2017 final poll ranking, is somewhat shocking, after not being rated all year.

Number 13: Canada dropped one spot from its 2016 ranking. Making it two straight years, Canada has failed to make the top 10. However, Canada continues to do well in three educational levels – Primary, High School, and College.

Number 12: Slovenia moves up six places from it 2016 finish. Slovenia makes their third appearances in the World Top 20 Final Poll Rankings. Slovenia also ranked in the top 20 in four education levels – Early Childhood, Primary, Secondary, and High School graduation rates –in 2017.

Number 11: The Netherlands education system finishes number eleven for the second straight year. The Netherlands ranked top 20 in all five levels of NJ MED’s education Poll – Early Childhood, Primary, Secondary, High School and College. The Netherlands also was ranked in all four quarters of the poll and finished their projected 2017 first quarter ranked position number 11.

Number 10: Israel’s education system returned to the Top 10 in 2017. After, Israel ranked in four of the five of the World Top 20 Education Poll’s educational levels – Early Childhood, Secondary, High School, and College.

Number 9: Denmark’s education system ranked in the top 10 in all four quarters of the 2017 World Top 20 Poll. This makes Denmark’s fifth consecutive year in finishing in the top 20, and ranked top 20 in 4 education levels – Early Childhood, Primary, High School, and College.

Number 8: Finland’s education system in most people’s opinion is the world’s best. However, Finland never has been able to capture NJ MED’s World Top 20 Education Poll’s final number one spot. Finland’s education system from the outside looks strong, evident by NJ MED projected Finland to finish number one in 2017. Yet, Finland never ranked higher than number five in the year-end rankings. The 2017 final poll continues to show Finland’s early childhood education system does not rank internationally.

Number 7: Singapore’s strong standardized test scores for Primary and Secondary levels keeps them in the top half of the World Top 20 Education Poll. Yet, this is Singapore’s lowest finish in five years.

Number 6: United Kingdom’s education system ranked six for the second year in the row. The UK ranked top 10 in four education levels in 2017. Number one in Early Childhood enrollment, number nine in Primary and number ten in Secondary test score levels, and finished number 7 in college student’s graduation rates.

Number 5: China’s education system finished in the top five of the World Top 20 Education Poll, for the first time in 2017. China ranked top 20 in four education levels – Primary, Secondary, High School, and College.

Number 4: Hong Kong moved up 10 spots from last year’s ranking of the world’s best education systems. Hong Kong also finished top 20 in four of the World Top 20 Education Poll’s academic levels – Primary, Secondary, High School, and College.

Number 3: Russia was the only non-Asian nation to finish in the World Top 20 Poll’s top five. Russia also was one of only four countries (Netherlands, Japan, and South Korea) to finish top 20 in all five educational levels of the World Top 20 Education Poll – Early Childhood Enrollments, Primary and Secondary academic scores, and both High School and College graduation rates.

Number 2: Japan’s education system finished number two for the fourth year in a row, after finishing number one in NJ MED’s first World Top 20 Education Poll. Japan’s education system ranked in the top five in four levels – Primary, Secondary, High School and College, but only reached number 17 in Early Childhood education enrollment.

Number 1: South Korea is declared the best-educated country in 2017. Making it four years in a row. South Korea’s education system also ranked top fifth teen in all five-education levels of the World Top 20 Education Poll. With all the success, South Korea’s education system achieves, it still does not get the recognition it deserves. The fact, NJ MED projected South Korea would not finish number one in 2017, shows South Korea’s domination in education is real.

Expect A Big Shake-Up in 2018

In 2018, NJ MED will publish its first draft World Education Data Base of 265 nations. So, the nations who rank well in one of the five educational levels will push some of this year’s top 20 countries out.

The 2018 World Education Data Base will also allow everyone to see, where each country ranks in- Africa, Asia, the Oceania, Europe, North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean’s.

But for now, congratulations to South Korea, the best of the best.

 

Year in Review 2017

0

A Year in Review: the 5 Biggest Challenges the World Top 20 Project Faced in 2017

The World Top 20 Project’s mission is to ensure every child on the planet has an opportunity to reach their full potential, with access to quality education in a safe and nurturing environment.

Each year the World Top 20 Project reviews world events that put children at risk.

Below is a list of 20 events in 2017 that threaten our cause.

Number 5:

Human Sacrifice in South Sudan

What is War Good for? Nothing

The civil war in South Sudan has taken a heavy toll on children and teens. The war began in December 2013 after government troops — known as the Sudan People’s Liberation Army or SPLA.
No one knows how many South Sudanese people have been killed since the outbreak of the civil war.
“South Sudanese children suffer from…violence, displacement, lack of schooling, and forced recruitment by armed groups. Children have also at times been directly targeted by armed forces, often because of their ethnic group,” Jehanne Henry, a senior researcher in Human Rights Watch’s Africa Division, told Teen Vogue.
Here is more information about why Sudanese children and their families have become victims:
Civil war and lack of food wreck children’s education in South Sudan
South Sudan’s civil war creates a new lost generation
Over 1 million refugees from South Sudan now in Uganda

Number 3:

The News Just Keeps Getting Worse from Nigeria

It was reported in 2017, Nigeria has the ‘largest number of children out-of-school’ in the world

Was the report true? The answer is NO. However, Nigeria does have over 8.0 million children out of school.

As the largest country in Africa, Nigeria’s investment in children education is an embarrassment to the continent. The country is a case study of a nation divided. Especially in northern Nigeria where the largest population of the Out-of-School children live. This diminishes their reputation around the world, and reveals their instability as a nation.

With so many of the country’s government and business leaders fail to understand. “No nation can achieve economic prosperity without a sound, inclusive and functional education system. The security and stability of the country, to a large extent, depends on its ability to provide functional education to its citizens,” said the country’s government,
Permanent Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education, Adamu Hussaini.

You can find more information about Nigeria’s education system, below:

Does Nigeria have the world’s most girls out-of-school, as activist Malala claimed?
Boko Haram Leaves 3 Million Kids Out of School in N. Nigeria
Poor Investment in Education

Number 4:

Killing the Mind

Practicing Evil Ways

Millions of young students in low and middle-income countries face the prospect of lost opportunity and lower wages in later life because their primary and secondary schools are failing to educate them to succeed in life
About 617 million children and adolescents worldwide are not achieving minimum proficiency levels in reading and mathematics, signaling “a learning crisis” that could threaten progress on global development goals, according to UNESCO
Lack of a good education equals lack of a proper job, which results in too much free time for young adults that is often poorly utilized. And for children in undeveloped countries, they are more exposed to gang violence, theft, drug use and child exploitation. Which means, children and adults with a meaningful lack of education are more vulnerable to victimization.
Who benefits from this???
Below are links to more information, on the learning crisis from around the world:
More than half of children and youth worldwide ‘not learning’
World Bank warns of ‘global learning crisis’
World Development Report 2018

Number 2:

The Abuse of Power

Trust Miss Found

We’re here to HELP. To help defend those who cannot defend themselves. The International community formed a special group through the United Nations called UN Peacekeeping. The UN Peacekeeping operates in some of the toughest and most dangerous places in the world, going where others cannot or will not.
The UN’s Peacekeeping mission to protect human life around the world is a godsend. With men and women from over 130 nations serving as Peacekeepers to help countries navigate the difficult path from conflict to peace. And helping prevent conflict, reducing violence and strengthening security in the field where it matters most.
Sometimes a good cause can go bad. And in Haiti it did. Where groups of Peacekeepers from Sri Lanka committed the vilest acts on a people and children. The only punishment they’ve received was to go home. If the UN and its nation members, don’t act on punishing this group of evildoers, it will threaten the credibility of the UN Peacekeepers forever.
Read more related information on the victimization of Haitian children:
More than 100 UN peacekeepers ran a child sex ring in Haiti. None were ever jailed
UN PEACEKEEPERS: HOW A HAITI CHILD SEX RING WAS WHITEWASHED
How traffickers exploit children in Haiti’s orphanages

Number 1:

Profit and Greed Over Life

Child Exploitation

Many of the world’s top company’s are using child labor to help increase profits for their stock value and shareholders pockets. You to maybe also helping to exploit children if you buy any products from these companies – Microsoft, Lenovo, Renault, Vodafone, Huawei, L&F, Tianjin B&M, BYD, Coslight, Shenzhan BAK, ZTE (See the complete list of other companies)

Over 150 million children are victims of cheap labor, and most work long hours for little pay or for no pay as slaves. Most people don’t care. If they don’t see it or know about it, what’s wrong with it.

Everything is wrong with it. Former child labor workers are more likely to have low-paying jobs as adults, which increases the world poverty rate. It also destroys the child. It erases what could have been to endlessness and hopelessness. So again, who cares?

Of course, companies deny, they support child labor. They say, We are helping create jobs in poor countries, through Global Partnerships. That helps raise families out of poverty. They strongly feel, if children are working in these countries. The local manufacturers are responsible for these senseless acts?

Whomever is to blame. Is something you have to decide. We’ve selected Child labor and the forces around it, as the greatest challenge the World Top 20 Project’s mission faced in 2017.

Learn more about child labor:

IS MY PHONE POWERED BY CHILD LABOUR?
Child Labour in the Fashion Industry
5 Companies That Still Use Slave Labor

15 Other Major Challenges Children and Countries Faced in 2017:

Rohingya children forced to work, beaten and sexually assaulted – IOM

The downsides to Singapore’s education system: streaming, stress and suicides

What’s Really Keeping Pakistan’s Children Out of School?

Male rape and sexual torture in the Syrian war: ‘It is everywhere’

Child sex abuse live streams rising at ‘alarming rate’ amid surge in ‘cybersex trafficking’

HOW POLITICAL CORRUPTION FUELS GANG VIOLENCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA

Heavy fighting forces thousands of Ukrainian children out of school

We need compulsory sex education in primary schools to tackle child-on-child abuse

More children in Japan victimized by sexually explicit selfies

TEACHERS VICTIMS OF WORKPLACE TERROR

School Violence in Morocco and the Need for a True Reform

Africa’s future depends on education

Maria’s smallest victims: In Puerto Rico, children’s mental health a growing concern

High Schools Are Dealing With Repeated Acts Of Racism And Students Are Concerned

For The Venezuelan Opposition, Protests Are ‘Like A War’

Solution: 4 Billion Ways to Save Our Children

0

Every parent wants the same thing… God. Please protect my child.

There is no guarantee; every child born will have an opportunity to reach its full potential. Why?

Because the WORLD does not work like that.

Some of us may have a better opportunity than others. To see our children become successful.

Because of where we live, how much money we make, and the support system we have.

However, that is no guarantee; our children will grow up healthy, happy, and self-confident. So many things can happen to prevent our children from becoming successful.

Drugs, alcohol, bullying, sex-abuse, gun violence, and wars.

What Can We Do to Lower the Odds?

The challenges of raising our children in a safe and nurturing environment is becoming harder, day by day, week by week, month by month, and year by year.

It seems there is a force out there, whose only mission is to take our children from us. We need to find solutions.

If you have been following us (NJ MED) for over the last 5 years, you know. We deeply believe education is the hope we need, to help cure the world’s problems, and save our children.

We’ve seen how it can change lives, and make our children strong. Successful and turn the odds in our favor against poverty, violence, and hopelessness.

So we are asking, everyone, everywhere to trust us, and believe in one another. Because, without that, our mission to save our children and Educate Every Child on the Planet is nothing without you.

How do We Do It?

To educate every child on the planet, you need access. You have to see them, hear them, and be able to give them the tools they need to become successful.

It’s estimated that there are over 210 countries in the world. Small ones, large ones, those with access to lights, those without, those with roads to those without.

Given those facts. It will be easier to work with those countries that we have easy access too.

We can work with them to address social issues and encourage them towards higher education (something we have already begun – Global rankings of Educational Systems and Universities).

However, gaining access to nations that lack resources or provide human rights to children and their families is not as easy. Because we have to address both social and academic needs. Therefore, making it the most challenging, to get access to and to develop a support system.

Working Together towards a Common Goal

The United Nations and every major international organization have been working to save our children and our planet’s future, since 2000. With two major initiatives – The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

NJ MED joined these initiatives in 2012, and are committed to using all of its resources, to help them accomplish their goals (especially Goal number 4 – Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all).

One of our major resources is our staff relationship with World Football.

FIFA, the world’s governing body of football, has 209 member nations. Since 2005, they have joined the international effort to address development in economic, social and environmental sustainability.

Their flagship initiative – Football for Hope – focuses on working with children in education and health. The same common goal, our project (World Top 20 Project) and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals Initiative wants to achieve.

With the support of the SDGs members, FIFA members, and universities around the world, we can accomplish the goal to save our children.

Good vs. Greed

Knowing is Half the Battle

Knowing there is a problem and wanting to do something about it. Is just a start.

So where do we start? Where the biggest problem is.

Knowing there are over 260 million children out of school. And nearly one billion adults  illiterate, unemployed and live in poverty because of a lack of education. Means, we have to go where the biggest challenges are – Africa and Asia.  

How do we do that?                                                              

  1. We have to get access to information
  2. We have to update the information
  3. We have to identify problem areas
  4. We have to develop a way to provide resources to address their problem areas
  5. We have to create funding sources to make the effort sustainable.

So, we have to work together to win the war to Save (ALL) Our Children?

IF You have Nothing Better to Do, Why NOT?

Let’s begin with the first step: get access to information. Currently, over half of African and Asian countries database on education is out of date by 4 to 6 years or does not even exist!

So, we have to build a temporary database profile for each country. We need real information from international and national organizations that track population’s sizes and to gather data on each country’s economic and social condition.

We can get this information from our United Nations ECOSOC partners and two Higher Education Initiatives – Higher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI) and Higher Education and Research for Sustainable Development (HESD).

Once, we establish a communication system to gather data. We need to update the information, by hiring an outsource group to collect information on each country’s education system, and have that information confirmed from three reliable sources.

To complete, the update information process, we will use another outsource group to collect additional educational information, that must also be confirmed by three reliable sources, to establish a real-time educational database of each country.

Let’s Get to Work

After, the education database is created for each country. We need to assess and develop their social and economic profile. That will outline each nation’s strength and weakness in their educational development of their children.

Which will give us a clear idea of the challenges and problem areas in each country’s education system.

From, the lack of early childhood education investment. To the safety, children face in going to school in unstable governments. To countries recovering from natural disasters. We have to know what is and has happened, to better prepare us for the worst.

Our organization, NJ MED, with international education experts, local media outlets, and regional NGOs partners of the SDGs Initiative will help conduct the assessment process.

With this information, we can organize and plan to develop a way to provide resources to address problem areas in each country. From early childhood to post-secondary education.

Counting the Cost

Billions of dollars have been or have been promised, to accomplish the 17 Goals of the Sustainable Development Goals by the year 2030.

We are not counting on that money to fight our battles. We need to develop a system that will invest, monitor, and stimulate growth within each country, city, and village. That is the only way this will work.

It will take time, but, time will work in our favor.

With 4 Billion World Football supporters and more than 3 Billion Internet users, we have a great chance to make history. And Save Our Children.

By the year 2023, you will see and feel the progress that we’ve made. “So Stay Tuned”.